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FOAM, Invisible City, Oculus, The Geometry of Innocence

A Call from the Wilderness, or What Gets Lost and What Gets Created

[New blog entry for the FOAM Museum  Blog in Amsterdam. This is how they describe it: Foam Blog’s heavyweight Ken Schles is back. Here he acknowledges the important role programmes like Noorderlicht play in supporting the development of an artist’s practice.]

Far from it for me to second-guess policy concerning the Eurozone’s economic crisis or make statements on Dutch economic policy or policies that affect regional arts funding in provincial areas. I am not Dutch and have no standing in a political world I admittedly know little of. I have, however been the recipient of the largesse afforded to me by the Dutch government and, vicariously, by extension, the Dutch people. And for that I am eternally grateful. For without that support it is highly doubtful that I would be sitting here now and writing to you today, wherever you live, be it in Amsterdam or Brooklyn, Guangdong province or Bursa.

Thirteen years ago, when I was still plowing the Internet with a 28.8k dial-up modem, I got a message from across the sea.

Read on (to hear more about Noorderlicht, see an embedded talk by Laurie Anderson and look at more images from my Geometry of Innocence project)… (new link redirects as the FOAM link expired)

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About kenschles

Ken Schles is the author of Invisible City (1988; reprint 2015 and 2016), The Geometry of Innocence (2001), A New History of Photography: The World Outside and the Pictures In Our Heads (2007), Oculus (2011) and Night Walk (2015 and 2016). His work has been nominated for the Deutsche Börse Prize, exhibited by The Museum of Modern Art, noted by the New York Times Book Review, cited in histories of the medium (Parr/Badger, Auer & Auer, 10x10 American Photobooks) and issued by some of the foremost publishers of our time (Steidl, Hatje Cantz, Twelvetrees Press). They're considered “intellectual milestones in photography” (Süddeutsche Zeitung), “hellishly brilliant” (The New Yorker). Ken Schles’ work is included in private and public collections such as The Museum of Modern Art, The Rijksmuseum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museo d"Arte Contemporanea (MACRO) Testaccio Museum, and more than 100 other museum and library collections world-wide. 
 Ken Schles is a NYFA Fellow. http://www.kenschles.com

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